College basketball corruption charges


#789

And what makes you think the NCAA will actually do anything once they start to investigate? They show how much of a joke they are every single time they investigate a top program.


#790

Well, they do have actual sworn testimony to work with, so there’s at least a chance they do something.

Seems like this is kind of a test for them, though. If, with sworn testimony implicating programs like Kansas and Arizona, they still don’t restrain those programs from the levels of success they have been achieving (Arizona apparently has the top-ranked recruiting class next year, isn’t that interesting) then the message to other programs will be pretty clear. In basketball and football.

Sworn testimony is the key. Most investigations peter out when the principles refuse to cooperate, but the testimony here is already out in the open. The NCAA has no excuse not to hammer those schools that are implicated.

Of course they are already failing, because certain athletes for whom payments have been solicited are playing right now.


#791

Sure it obviously helps to have sworn testimony, but there still needs to be an organizational desire to do something about it, which the NCAA never seems to have when a major program is involved. Just look at the North Carolina cheating example. They did far worse than Missou ever did, but they got a pass while Mizzou gets the hammer.


#792

This house of cards is teetering on the crash. Big business, aka the NBA could some day absorb the game. The NCAA in my opinion is just trying to protect it’s brand and more importantly THE MONEY!! In the G league I believe the new rules allow $100K for incoming freshman and the ability to collect endorsements. You can bet NIKE, UA, Adidas, are licking their chops, maybe even start their own leagues. It will be an interesting 5 years for the NCAA and NBA…keep an eye on the viewing/media contracts.


#793

I think the most challenging part of all the NCAA stuff is what actually is a violation? UNC (given, I’ve been a UNC fan for most of my life) had an institutional issue with their classes that more regular students took advantage of than athletes. Does it make it right, absolutely not, but it’s not really an NCAA issue if the school is allowing everyone to take advantage of the “classes.” Didn’t everyone have a professor or two in college that they knew would give them an easy grade?

To an extent, it’s the same idea as the “Wildcat Lounge” at Kentucky. The housing is specifically for basketball players but regular students have to occupy 51% of the building. So, Kentucky has their managers live there and a few regular to students to keep the percentage to where it needs to be. I’m sure other colleges have similar situations.

NCAA also gave Penn State penalties for the Jerry Sandusky stuff and it had absolutely nothing to do with the NCAA. I’m sure something will happen at Michigan State with the Larry Nassar stuff. As gross as the crimes were, the NCAA shouldn’t have jurisdiction in those types of cases.

It’s pretty obvious that something is going down at Kansas and Arizona. It’ll be interesting to see what happens to Self and Miller when everything is played out.


#794

Will Wade suspended indefinitely in the wake of the wiretap evidence of he and Christian Dawkins discussing paying players.


#795

If every students have equal opportunity to access those fantom classes in UNC, then NCAA should not care. But I don’t buy the arrangement such as Wildcat Lounge. How it is different from entertaining 3 basketball recruits along with 4 regular college applicants?


#796

I think there are a few “regular” students who live there, they just have to pay way more than a regular dorm. I want to say there are a few more places that are like this, UK’s version of it just seems more prominent.


#797

There is are certain number of regular students who live in the Wildcat Lounge (don’t recall how many) for it to not considered an impermissible benefit.


#798

But UNC set the class up specifically for athletes. Frat boys then discovered the free grade, and eventually it became known campus-wide. UNC couldn’t very well restrict it to athletes, but that doesn’t really take the stink off it.


#799

Sounds like Sean Miller is probably a goner based on his farewell-ish type speech last night.


#800

#801

The problematic part for college athletics is Riddell’s day job: director of college entrance exam prep at IMG Academy in Florida, the school which churns out scores of college recruits in nearly every sport, including elite players in football, basketball and baseball.

Wow. Does Beilein back off Lester Quinones?


#802

For instance, Fox is accused of working as a middleman in 2015 between a Beverly Hills, California, real estate developer and the tennis coach at the University of San Diego to secure admission to the school. That included, the feds charge, Fox receiving a wire transfer of $100,000 and delivering an undisclosed sum to the coach.

There are some sorry-ass rich kids out there. USD is no prize.


#803

I don’t understand. Mom and dad are going to help them get a cushy, well paying job after college anyways, who cares what school they go to?


#804

True, Bacon and bebopson, but it’s an entitlement thing. It’s a personal pride, albeit a false sort of pride. I don’t have to keep up with the Joneses, I AM the Jonses and I can get whatever I want, kind of thing.

For the ultra wealthy that $100k is like a ten dollar bill burning a hole in my pocket. And believe me, I think long and hard before spending that $10. Hell, look how long it took me to join umhoops! :rofl:


#805

It’s clearly more about status than anything of substance. It might as well be a country club. It’s not about education, because if it were, they wouldn’t need to bribe anybody.


#806

Lester is at IMG and Cade is at Montverde.


#807

Thanks for the correction. Nonetheless, at this point, at the very least, you have to double-down on your due diligence with any of these high-end prep factories.


#808

Test fixing and grade fixing has been going on for years. It’s not something new, just new to the public.