North Carolina receives NOA


#1
The University of North Carolina has received its Notice of Allegations from the NCAA, but will not release the details of the report until a later date, according to sources familiar with the investigation.

The NCAA does not publicly announce delivery of a Notice of Allegations and member institutions are not required to release the full report. UNC is expected to announce the receipt of its NOA on Friday afternoon.


#2

“We take these allegations very seriously, and we will carefully evaluate them to respond within the NCAA’s 90-day deadline. The University will publicly release the NCAA’s notice as soon as possible. The notice is lengthy and must be prepared for public dissemination to ensure we protect privacy rights as required by federal and state law. When that review for redactions is complete, the University will post the notice on the Carolina Commitment website and notify the news media. When we respond to the NCAA’s allegations, we will follow this same release process. Consistent with NCAA protocols, the University cannot comment on details of the investigation until it is completed.”


#3

This should be the first “death penalty” since SMU. UNC football had the second most first and second round draft picks in the last 12 years behind only AL. We now know how non-qualifiers matriculated at UNC and stayed eligible. UNC has achieved a high profile basketball program by cheating over a long period of time.


#4
This should be the first "death penalty" since SMU. UNC football had the second most first and second round draft picks in the last 12 years behind only AL. We now know how non-qualifiers matriculated at UNC and stayed eligible. UNC has achieved a high profile basketball program by cheating over a long period of time.

I think a severe punishment is deserved and will be given eventually. I can’t believe there are people that think UNC is getting out of this with a slap of the wrist.


#5

Although I am hopeful the NCAA will render a severe penalty, I am still skeptical until I see it. It seems that after the initial media attention wears off, the penalty often ends up being just a single missed postseason and loss of a scholarship or two, but nothing substantial enough to really hurt a program like UNC hoops long-term.

OSU is the biggest example of this. They took their lumps for one year, and didn’t miss a beat since the minimal scholarship losses they had couldn’t make a dent in their program. USC seemed to be the exception, but the way the NCAA reversed course on PSU indicates that perhaps they had some “regret” about how much they punished USC.

Bottom line: With the money these big-time programs like UNC make for the NCAA, I am still doubtful that anything remotely close to the death penalty will happen. It pays to cheat these days.


#6
This should be the first "death penalty" since SMU. UNC football had the second most first and second round draft picks in the last 12 years behind only AL. We now know how non-qualifiers matriculated at UNC and stayed eligible. UNC has achieved a high profile basketball program by cheating over a long period of time.

I don’t believe in the death penalty because it could remove innocent kids from where they want to be if they still want to play basketball. Go ahead and gut the coaching staff and compliance department and instill heavy fines and scholarship limits, but the basketball players shouldn’t have to suffer if they didn’t do anything wrong.


#7

I suspect there will be a lot of internal disagreement about how to punish UNC. They’ll end up with a compromise set of penalties. No slap on the wrist, certainly no death penalty. Of course, we still don’t know the details of the charges.


#8

Apparently even slaps on the wrist are considered outside the NCAA’s lane. Excuse me while I vomit…

https://sports.yahoo.com/ncaa-hands-no-punishment-north-carolina-academic-fraud-scandal-141411202.html


#9

People who are surprised or outraged about this do not have a good understanding on what happened.


#10

The hardest part for people to grasp is that this an institutional issue NOT an athletic issue. Were there athletes that took the classes? Absolutely…but there were more non-athletes taking them than athletes.

Think about this for a second. If you are a college student, did you talk to other students about certain professors or certain classes to make sure you had an easier time for a certain semester or year? I think this happens to almost everyone. I’m not saying it’s right but it happens on every college campus in America. Probably not to the extent of this but it isn’t that far fetched.


#11

Sure, every university has a few cupcake electives. The issue is that athletes are steered exclusively toward such classes.


#12

It seems naive to think that these classes weren’t created for the athletes, and then diluted with normal students, for cover. But maybe I’m just caught up in the narrative. And it was definitely naive to think the NCAA/UNC’s athletic department would dole out any semblance of punishment


#13

They already got punished for the academic issue that it was. The accreditation agency put UNC on probation for several years, it was just so long ago that nobody even remembers.

Here’s the deal: colleges around the nation have absurdly high credit athlete only courses in such strenuous topics as weightlifting or strength and conditioning. Everyone knows what these classes are meant for. I don’t understand how that’s totally acceptable and what UNC did isn’t (And I agree that what UNC did is not acceptable).

Here are some colleges that feature academic credit courses with no academic work and 100% athlete enrollment:
Memphis
Iowa State
BYU
Florida State
Pitt
Ohio State
Oregon
Gonzaga
Auburn
Iowa
Kansas State
NC State
Penn State
Stanford
USC
Nebraska

I for one think that genre of class is more egregious than ridiculously easy academic courses.


#14

Yeah, i think those classes are dumb and shouldnt be allowed, too. But the argument Im making is ‘two wrongs dont make a right’ etc etc. One of the sport’s powers got caught, and the punishment was lacking. Looking the other way whenever someone gets caught isn’t productive. Sufficiently punishing parties that are found to be guilty, while not punishing the cheaters who aren’t found to be guilty (or aren’t caught) may not be fair, but it’s a smidge of justice where there would otherwise be none.

The FBI isn’t going to catch and/or charge every team/coach/shoe company who paid players, but it’s still good that some of them are getting punished.


#15

Best articke I’ve read on here. UNC changing its tune is egregious. https://sports.yahoo.com/north-carolina-blows-ncaa-smithereens-embarrassing-academic-fraud-defense-010926838.html


#16

Come ON, this. Why the hell else would the classes EXIST? Unless it’s a joint Greek system/Athletic Program conspiracy. Very clever - each group serves to dilute the presence of the other group in these classes. You can be proud you skated, but this is nothing to be proud of. Yeah, I’ll really bet no athletic coach ever made a plea for the classes to stay open. I’ll bet it went something like, hey, if some of these greek kids don’t want to take advantage of the educational opportunities at this school, either, so what. Not everyone is here to be an intellectual."

Really, I’d like to hear any non-nefarious explanation for the existence of the classes. Whose motives were served by the creation and continued existence of these classes? Anyone with clean motives, and if so, what were they?


#17

When the most commonly cited report is so devoid of necessary fact checking it’s not hard to see why so many people are misled on the scandal.


#18

Misled how?